Hard Truths about Farming & Gardening

A few weeks ago we attended a screening of a documentary, “Growing Cities,” about the rise in urban farming across America. From rooftops to empty lots, from New York to Oregon, people are growing their own food (as humanity did for millennia until relatively recently on the evolutionary scale). The evening, hosted by Slow Food […]

One Little Chile in a Tiffany’s Box

I’m thinking it might be the most humble but exotic item that ever did appear in one of those little blue boxes. This dignified surprise arrived in our Christmas gift package from my sister and brother-in-law. One shriveled red chile. We sniffed it — such a subtle mix of smoke, citrus, berry and heat—and we […]

Photographic Inspiration in the Garden

On really good days, The Photographer gets an itch and takes his camera to an array of food without any prodding from me. This is precisely what happened last week in our garden where, apparently, our chard still grows tall and strong (for those who don’t know, I’m in Boulder and Jerry is in New […]

Harvest Weekend

I spent Labor Day weekend in the kitchen. I went home to see the husband—as well as the peaches, tomatoes, grapes, eggplants, peppers, arugula, chard and basil. A quick trip, in all respects. I caught a bus, I boarded a plane (cool thing about Colorado: the RTD, which, with my faculty pass, allowed me a […]

Growth

A baby Naga chile—the world’s hottest—hangs from a plant in a Wisconsin garden on the edge of Pewaukee Lake. And so the Boulder life begins. The week passed in a gust of activity—I’ve been packing, planning, meeting and “orientating.” Picking classes, touring the library. Setting up my new computer and phone. I’ve discovered a treasure […]

The Onions That Walk the Earth

Three summers ago, we bought a little house near the Rio Grande. You might recall the dump that it was. It’s still a work in progress (and I’m beginning to think we will never reach completion). But every now and then, I glimpse a few photos of years past and I see that we have […]

This Garden Is the Bomb

A villager named Haum waters her onions, growing in an American cluster bomb casing in Kunpho, Laos. Laotians everywhere have turned war scrap into useful tools. The large metal casings from cluster munitions can sell for upwards of $40—a near fortune to many rural villagers. But some gardeners prefer to keep the casings, turning them […]