About the Rambler



Welcome to my ramblings on dinner & drink, people & places, our planet’s health & the future of food. I’m a journalist, author and media trainer. My kitchen forever smells of garlic and curry. And much like my mother, I start thinking of dinner long before breakfast….

What is Rain?

A woman gazes through a window at the Bario Asal Longhouse as rain pummels the area.

I started this post a few days ago, before this and this and this. Before nature smacked Colorado with a torrent of “biblical” proportions, a storm of the century, possibly the millennium. Here in New Mexico, . . . → Ramble More: What is Rain?

Rhubarb & Rain

Rhubarb and strawberry sauce on yogurt with fresh mint leaves.

A summertime strawberry double whammy: berries topped with yogurt, mint and rhubarb-strawberry sauce.

Here in New Mexico, we are living in exceptional times – “exceptional” being the word weather monitors use to describe some of the nation’s worst drought conditions: rivers gone dry, ditches of dust. We’ve seen some relief this past . . . → Ramble More: Rhubarb & Rain

When the River Runs Dry

Last month our local NPR affiliate, KUNM, aired a story about the Rio Grande and its potential future as a ‘ghost river’ of the American Southwest. Jerry and I know this story. We live less than a mile from its ups and downs. This river is the reason we have . . . → Ramble More: When the River Runs Dry

Watching, Hearing the Rice

A long time ago, during one of my initial stays in Southeast Asia, I first heard a certain saying about farmers throughout the region: some of them plant the rice, others watch it grow, and some simply listen to it grow. It’s meant to be a commentary on stereotypes, ethnic relations and workmanship. I . . . → Ramble More: Watching, Hearing the Rice

Eggs on Climate Change

As many of you undoubtedly know, world leaders are meeting this week in Durban, South Africa, in another round of climate talks. Meanwhile, last week, Yale Environment 360 reported on the deaths of oyster larvae in the Pacific Northwest. It’s a climate change problem. As humanity pumps more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the . . . → Ramble More: Eggs on Climate Change

Wow. That stung a bit.

(Guest post by Jerry)

Welcome back!

The Rambler was down there for a bit, but certainly not out. A webhosting snafu kept the blog software from finding and reading the rich, well-reported database of Truth, that is the essence of Ramblingspoon (Techno babble: php scripts inexplicably stopped fetching data from the SQL database. Had to . . . → Ramble More: Wow. That stung a bit.

Food Miles, Southeast Asian Style

Buses stop at the Nam Ou River in Muang Khua, Laos. Tiny town it is, but it sits on a major trade route linking Thailand, Laos and Vietnam.

I’ve been thinking a lot about the journeys my dinners endure. The more I read, the more I learn, the more trouble . . . → Ramble More: Food Miles, Southeast Asian Style

The Fish at the End of the Road

Valu Beach, below Tutuala, East Timor

This is not here. This, above, is Valu Beach on the far tip of East Timor. “Here,” for me, right now, is Boulder, Colorado, beneath a fresh dump of snow. I could use a burst of Timorese warmth right now.

I’m traveling to East . . . → Ramble More: The Fish at the End of the Road

Are We There Yet?

An Indian man transports water in the wintertime fog of an early morning in West Bengal.

Are we even close?

Last week, world leaders gathered in New York to discuss progress made—or not—toward meeting the Millennium Development Goals aimed at alleviating world hunger, poverty and disease. On the upside: we . . . → Ramble More: Are We There Yet?

Lao Food News Roundup

Davone, a villager in Sophoon, shaves her homegrown cassava in Phongsali province, which is considered one of the country’s poorest and most remote. Sophoon, however, enjoys relative prosperity: most families have enough rice to sustain them through this year’s dry season. The village sits on a swiftly flowing river, which spins family . . . → Ramble More: Lao Food News Roundup